Exhibition: L’adresse, Museum of La Poste

I didn’t know the existence of pneumatic networks of communication in Paris in the 60’s. I’ve always been fascinated by these devices in Brazil (1985), they look exactly like it! As shown in this video http://youtu.be/lfjLpa-n4d0?t=1h45m5s

I also found this information in Montagné’s book: Transmissions (2008) – see this post.
Text taken from the museum: “Le pneumatique apparaît à Paris en 1866, il est constitué d’un ensemble de tuyaux parcourus par des cylindres appelés curseurs et acheminés par déplacement d’air. Le réseau, placé dans les égouts, relie les bureaux télégraphiques. Il atteint une longueur de 400km en 1957. Les curseurs voyagent jusqu’à 600 mètres/minutes et peuvent contenir 35 lettres. Le pneumatique cesse de fonctionner en 1984.”

I found this last week, I went to L’Adresse Musée de La Poste. – http://www.laposte.fr/adressemusee – “L’Adresse Musée de La Poste is a place of preservation and diffusion of the mail heritage centred on Writing, History and Culture. From Seven League Boots to the Aeoropostale’s heroes, by way of the panorama of 160 years of the French postage stamps, the Museum collections tell us a story, not only about a company but also about everyday life. Openned since 1946” Here is a couple of pictures I made over there.

• Montagné, J. C. (2008). Transmissions. Jean-Claude Montagné.

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Below, the feeling of missing someone is directly linked to the act of writing letters – in this advert.
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The rest of my pictures in this gallery

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